Tag: antioxidants

Food Spotlight: Artichokes

Not only do artichokes make such beautiful centerpieces with their unique texture and flower-shape, but they also provide several health benefits.
 
History: Artichokes are one of the oldest cultivated vegetables in the world. They originate from the Mediterranean and Northern African regions and have been harvested since the 5th century BC. It takes 6 months for the buds to be ready to eat, however they can be harvested as many as 30 times a season, with their peak season being in both the Spring and Fall.
 
Nutrition Profile: Artichokes are high in fiber and are loaded with vitamins and minerals like Vitamin C, Vitamin K, folate, phosphorus, and magnesium. In fact, a medium artichoke contains almost 7 grams of fiber, which is a whopping 23-28% of the reference daily intake (RDI). They are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, which is particularly important with both corona virus and flu season upon us. Additionally, artichokes have been shown to: reduce both unhealthy (LDL) and total cholesterol, increase good (HDL) cholesterol, lower blood pressure for those with pre-existing elevated levels, and improve digestive issues such as bloating flatulence, and constipation.    
 
How to Eat: Artichokes can be eaten both warm or cold. The heart, which is fully edible, is a culinary delicacy and is known for its smooth and nutlike flavor. The smaller heads, or buds, are usually the most tender and are typically served as a warm vegetable with a sauce or as a cold salad or appetizer. They can be steamed whole, cooked in a microwave, baked, roasted, grilled, or sautéed. 
 
Additional Tips: Artichokes are typically served with butter, cream, or mayo-based sauces. Because these options are high in saturated fat, be mindful of portion sizes. For healthier options, prepare a sauce with: nonfat, plain Greek yogurt, lemon juice, dijon mustard, garlic powder, and a pinch of salt or tahini with lemon, garlic, and salt.

Healthy Cranberry Sauce

Traditional cranberry sauce recipes typically call for 1 cup of sugar per 12 oz of cranberries. That means the bigger the batch = the more the sugar. We all know what happens when we choose foods or dishes that have too much sugar.⁣
 
This cranberry sauce recipe cuts down significantly on the sugar while providing key antioxidants your body needs.⁣ It only has 82 calories per 1/4 cup serving, is fast and easy to prepare, and takes advantage of all the wonderful fall spices that we love.⁣
 
Prep Time: 2 min⁣
Cook Time: 8 min⁣
Total Time: 10 min⁣
Yields: 2 cups⁣
Ingredients:⁣
1 (12 ounce) bag fresh cranberries⁣
½ cup honey or maple syrup (use maple syrup if you are vegan)⁣
½ cup water⁣
Zest of 1 medium orange (about 1 teaspoon)⁣
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon⁣
¼ teaspoon ground cloves⁣
¼ teaspoon ground allspice⁣
Optional add-in: ¼ cup fresh 100% orange juice⁣
Instructions:⁣
1. Rinse the cranberries well and drain any excess water. Discard any squishy ones.⁣
2. In a medium saucepan, combine the cranberries, honey (or maple syrup), and water. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cranberries have popped and the mixture has thickened, about 5-10 minutes.⁣
3. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the orange zest, cinnamon, allspice, and cloves. Taste and, if the mixture is too tart (keeping⁣
in mind that cranberry sauce should be a bit tart), add orange juice and/or or little more honey (or maple syrup).⁣
4. The sauce will continue to thicken as it cools. It will keep in the refrigerator, covered, for up to 2 weeks.⁣
Leave a comment 👇 if you can’t wait to try this!⁣